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DIY

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If this is your first time visiting my blog, I am so honored you are here!  I hope in some small way you find encouragement, inspiration, and validation as a mommy, a wife, and a creative soul.  If there’s one thing I’ve learned about women in my decades of walking in the (sometimes) cute shoes of one, it’s that women long to know they’re not alone in their frustrations, their worries, their fears, their celebrations, and their milestones.  Let me assure you, dear reader: YOU ~ are not alone.  I am eager to share this blogging journey with you in authenticity, creativity, and homemaking. One of the things I love to do in our home is combine my faith and inspiration with decorating so that our walls and spaces truly reflect the virtues and personal character we value.  One way to do this is through painted wooden signs, an easy and inexpensive way to speak scripture, encouragement, and hope to all who…

I’ve wanted to build one of these tomato cage Christmas trees forever.  This year, I was determined to make it happen.  Let me share with you how SUPER easy this was to do…and inexpensive compared to what you would spend to purchase one already potted and lit.First, I found a couple tomato cages at Lowe’s.  I bought these last year during the Christmas season;  I just asked where they stored out-of-season gardening supplies and the clerk led me right to them.I didn’t bother to secure the cages into my pots as I assumed the weight of the greenery would keep them in place.  These pots already held soil from summer plantings so I just turned the cages upside down and placed them on top of the soil in the pots. Next, I secured the tops with wire to make a pointed top for my tree (Fireman always has a roll of…

Today I’m sharing a little DIY project because it’s been awhile.This year, more than any other, I am committed to savoring small moments during the Christmas season.  I’ve found that these moments can sneak up on you when you least expect them.  Here are a few from our weekend:Roaming through Santa Claus House in North Pole with the kids and stumbling upon a video of a lady painting glass ornaments from the inside.  Captivating! (To clarify, the lady wasn’t on the inside, but her paintbrush reached inside the ornament.) Turning to see my two teenage sons carrying the very heavy Christmas tree box up two flights of stairs…and realizing it was no longer heavy for them.  My heart filled with gratitude and thankfulness for two strong, maturing young men in our home.  Watching my daughter open the first Christmas storage box and seeing her eyes fill with delight at the light-up…

Every now and then a girl needs to post a DIY project, especially if it’s simple and inexpensive.If it happens to be the month of September and the project just happens to be fall-themed, even better.These urns started out as flimsy white plastic containers from a thrift store.  They were $2 each.  I loved the shape and knew I could do something creative with them.I mixed up a chalk paint mixture of 1/2 cup Sherwin Williams Pussywillow (a gray/taupe color) with 1/2 T unsanded grout and started painting.  Chalk paint sticks to almost anything, including dirty, cheap plastic from a thrift store.  Truly.Here they are, still damp from the paint.  This picture doesn’t look much different; however, the paint color darkens as it dries.Once dry, I applied Annie Sloan’s Dark Soft Wax,with Miss Mustard Seed’s waxing brush (although you can use any dry paint brush, or even a soft cloth),…

Recently we tackled the construction of a DIY Balance Beam for my daughter’s 9th birthday.Purple, no less :)Following is a detailed step-by-step guide as to how we went about building it.  **Note: This project does involve cutting and welding steel.  If you have a husband who loves to build things, that’s also a plus:)Here are the materials we used:(3) 2′ x 6′ x 10′  (cut down to 4 1/2″ width to make slightly wider than Olympic width of 4″)(1) 5′ length 1″ steel square tubing cut into (4) 22″ lengths. All ends cut at 22 degree angle.(1) 5′ length 2 1/2″ wide steel flatbar (1’4″ – 3/8″ thick).  We used 3/8″ thick.From this flatbar, we cut two cradles to hold the wooden beam.  Each cradle had a bed 4 1/2″ wide, with side arms 2 7/8″ high.We also cut the four rectangular “feet” from this same flatbar, each foot being…